Chinese Version

Wenlan Hu Frost

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The World Trade Center Forever - Memorializing The 10th
Anniversary of The Death of The World Trade Center Series



The World
      Trade Center Montage




This series was painted in 2011, which is a tribute to the 10th anniversary of the death of the World Trade Center. Based on the artist life experience, Wenlan Hu Frost created these paintings for the remembrance of the World Trade Center and nearly 3,000 lost souls.

In this series of eight large acrylic paintings shown above and below, the artist rendered the World Trade Center abstractly and repeated the WTC motif in these eight paintings. For each painting, the artist used different color schemes to express her emotional feelings and love toward the World Trade Center and depicted the birth, rise, silver age, golden age, burning, death, resurrection, and eternity of the WTC.

For the next six additional individual paintings shown below, the artist painted these paintings based on the video and pictures taken from her living room widow and aftermath scenes from her memory, as well as feelings from her heart.

She used several different painting styles with brushes and palette knives to achieve a more painterly and expressive effect, which could better express her painful feelings and her eternal love toward the World Trade Center, as well as nearly 3,000 souls lost in that darkest day.

The artist created this tribute series with all of her heart. The destruction of the World Trade Center is the most unforgettable experience in the artist's life.

Wenlan Hu Frost lived one block away from the World Trade Center for nearly10 years. She enjoyed appreciating the majestic WTC twin towers from her 7th floor living room window and greeting them every day. She also worked in the World Trade Center South Tower between 1992 to 1997 at Dean Witter Reynolds as an equity research analyst.

The artist experienced the terrorist bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. It took her an hour to evacuate from the 63rd floor, walking down a dark, smoke-filled stairwell.

Wenlan Hu Frost and her family also experienced the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001. They witnessed the second plane pierce the South Tower from their living room window and watched the twin towers fall from nearby Wagner Park. The dust clouds from the collapse of the towers enveloped them, cutting off their sunlight and fresh air.

They evacuated across the Hudson River and spent that night in a makeshift Red Cross shelter in New Jersey. Through the floor-to-ceiling window of that shelter across the river they watched the orange glow above the WTC site as the flames continued to burn throughout the night.

It was days before they were able to return to their apartment to survey the damage caused when debris from the collapsing towers shattered the windows and filled their apartment with dust and broken glass.  The asbestos filled air made their eyes burning. Wenlan was then four months pregnant with her second son. The family was displaced for months until they relocated to Houston in 2002.

The 9/11 experience has totally changed the artist's life. Even after she moved to Houston, she was still haunted from time to time by the death of the World Trade Center and the fallen victims inside, which led her to create this series.

For many people, the World Trade Center symbolized New York, America or American capitalism, but for the artist, it was her workplace, her neighborhood, and an important part of her life, which could and should never be forgotten.

For American people, we should never ever forget the 9/11 attacks, as well as nearly 3,000 lost souls and the fallen World Trade Center. Remembering this history will help us understand and remember our mission and responsibilities as Americans.




The Birth of the World Trade Center

The Birth of the World Trade Center
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Rise of the World Trade Center

The Rise of the World Trade Center, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Silver Age of the World Trade Center

The Silver Age of the World Trade Center
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Golden Age of the World Trade Center

The Golden Age of the World Trade Center,
2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Burning of the World Trade Center

The Burning of the World Trade Center,
2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Death of the World Trade Center

The Death of the World Trade Center,
2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Resurrection of the World Trade Center

The Resurrection of the World Trade Center
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Eternity of the World Trade Center

The Eternity of the World Trade Center,
2011, Acrylic on canvas, 84"x60" (213 cm x 152 cm)




The Dark Force of Evil In Broad Daylight

The Dark Force of Evil In Broad Daylight
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 72"X60" (183 cm x 152 cm)
Based on Daniel Frost's video taken from the artist's apartment window




The Day
      President Bush Vows

The Day President Bush Vows
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 72"X60" (183 cm x 152 cm)




The
      Heart-Wrenching Moment

The Heart-Wrenching Moment
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 72"X60" (183 cm x 152 cm)




The Ghostly Night Glow at Ground Zero

The Ghostly Night Glow at Ground Zero
, 2010, Acrylic on canvas, 72"X60" (183 cm x 152 cm)
Based on Daniel Frost's photos taken from the artist's apartment window




America,
      Never Ever Forget

 America, Never Ever Forget
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 72"X60" (183 cm x 152 cm)




May Your Lost Souls Rest In Heaven

May Your Lost Souls Rest In Heaven
, 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 72"X60" (183 cm x 152 cm)






2022 Wenlan Hu Frost.  All Rights Reserved.